Categories
Hardware Linux Networking Software

Ideal travel router: GL-AR750S

Right. With the pandemic and all none of us are going to travel much but still…

About a year ago I purchased myself an OpenWRT router to use on the plane and in hotels.

And so far I really like both the device and the Hong Kong based brand (launching new and updated products, and releasing relatively regular updates for older products). Pick a device that fits your needs (USB powered? LTE? Small form factor?).

The GL-AR750S aka Slate is fully customizable but runs a few nice things out of the box: WireGuard (with a physical button to turn it on or off), OpenVPN, shell access, Tor (requires the latest firmware), IPv6, DoH (Cloudflare only for now), multiple SSIDs (i.e. Guest WiFi), and more.

Oh and I specifically picked this version (compared to other or cheaper ones) because it had both 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz, as well as 3 Gbit ports (1x WAN, 2x LAN).

Pick whatever works for you…

I use the device on flights, where I connect to the network once in the air, purchase WiFi or use iPass “for one device” and then connect to the interwebs behind my NAT-router from my iPad, phone(s), laptop(s), and even Shan‘s devices if she is travelling with me.

In hotels, I either connect it to the wired ethernet, if still available (tends to be more stable), or connect it to the guest WiFi and then connect my devices to the router: saves me from connecting to a new network and typing the room number and login/password/family name on every device. And once again hides the true number of connected devices; quite handy trick for those pesky hotels providing free access only to two devices.

Sure it takes a bit of setup every time: find a working USB port, sign in to the web interface, search for new networks if this is a new hotel or I haven’t travelled on this airline, connect to said network, sign in with iPass, and optionally enable VPN)…

And once in a while some fiddling with VPN or DNS that’s borking up or being blocked by overzealous firewalls.

Also, some in-flight entertainment USB ports don’t provide enough power (and/or are often broken — looking at you Lufthansa in economy) so be sure to carry a couple of these (US-plug works best) — I’ve already forgotten one on my last flight from MUC-SIN on LH, but luckily I have pretty easy access to these.

If you travel a lot it’s totally worth the money.

Categories
Apple Networking

iPad Pro USB-C Ethernet

I’ve had an iPad Pro with the new Magic Keyboard and one of the things I’ve been wondering… Say I am stuck in a datacenter and I need to ssh through wired networking to a server — sure I’ll definitely rather use my Mac laptop, but just in case… But would it actually work?

The answer is… Yes — but…

So plugging it straight into the USB-C port of the keyboard doesn’t do anything. I.e.: the dongle is not recognised, and for what it’s worth the switch doesn’t even light up to say a cable is connected. So that doesn’t work.

But plugging it straight into the iPad works… The network switch lights up, the iPad (under Settings) gets a new option called “Ethernet” (which oddly shows you a selection of connected adapters first — but I don’t know how you can have more than one). Clicking through you see the same options as you would for your WiFi network: IPs, DNS, etc.

Tadaaa!

I used an adapter from work, a Belkin, and I believe it’s the same one that’s being sold on the Apple Store. I don’t know if any dongle will work though (driver-wise and stuff).

Probably not that useful but good to know.

Categories
Misc Networking

0x04

Almost 10 years after I registered 0x04.com, it’s time to part ways.

0x04.com whois
old whois info — created 29 Aug 2010.

Yesterday I finalised the sale of 0x04.com.

My company in Singapore was called 0x04 pte. ltd. and to avoid any confusion I’ve renamed to su1 pte. ltd. su1 standing for Superuser.one. 🤷‍♂️

Categories
Linux Networking Software

NextDNS, EdgeOS and device names

Noticed that NextDNS was reporting old hostnames in the logs. For example old device names (devices that changed hostnames), devices that were definitely no longer on the network, or IPs that were matched to the wrong hostnames.

The culprit is how EdgeOS deals with its hosts file. Basically it just keeps all the old hosts added and just adds a new line at the end of the file.

NextDNS searches for the first valid entry in that file, which is always going to be an older record.

So the simplest solution I found was the turn off hostfile-update every so often. This clears the hosts file.

So ssh into the device, run configure, and then run these commands:

set service dhcp-server hostfile-update disable
commit
set service dhcp-server hostfile-update enable
commit
save
Categories
Linux Networking Software

Running WireGuard in a Docker container (RPi)

This follows the my two other posts about WireGuard.

Most of this can be copied from the amd64 post — with a minor change for making it work on RPi4. This is the full git repo (including both rpi and amd64).

The main difference is in the run.sh file. The installation is a bit different and we’ll need to install the Raspberry Pi kernel headers.

WireGuard is also installed from testing instead of Debian backports.

Note that for older RPi’s (ie gen 1) you’ll need to compile from scratch.